Tag Archive for: prana

5 Prana Vayus – Learn About & Restore The Vital Energies In Moving Meditation

This meditation in motion honoring the 5 Prana Vayus has been part of my morning routine for the past 2 years. It can be beneficial standing or in a chair. It has energized me when I wake up slow, coddled me when I struggled to get out of bed, quieted my mind when its running before my feet even touch the floor, kept my lungs vibrant, prepares my body and mind for seated meditation and allows me to celebrate the joy of breathing into my body for another day. Like getting to know a new friend, it has transformed and grown into a practice I cherish and am delighted to introduce to you. The video is short and basic, but the creation and daily practice of the meditation has been profound for me. I hope you enjoy continually learning about and experiencing the 5 Vayus intellectually, practically and energetically along with me. If so, please send me a comment!

Peace and Light, Megan

Shining One,
Breathing out, let go
And fall into knowing all of creation
As existing within space,
And you are absorbed in that
Vibrant empty fullness.
In this moment your body is intimate
With space, exchanging essence for essence.
Balance in the midst of vast emptiness,
Know utter freedom.
– The Radiance Sutras, Verse 35

Prana is the life force that is always moving and changing within us; it is what sets our life in motion and it is the power of becoming. We experience it physically as it rides the breath, but the underlying current of this animating force is energetic. Prana follows attention and responds to intention. As Prana enters the body, it separates and takes on different purposes in the body. These specific personalities of Prana are called the Vayus. The Vayus function as a whole like cogs in wheels, though they maintain their their specific location, movement direction and purpose.

Tasmin sati svasa prasvasaho gati-vicccheda pranayama
Pranayama is the conscious, deliberate regulation of the incoming and outgoing flow of breath replacing unconscious patterns of breathing. It is is possible only after reasonable mastery of asana practice.
– Patanjali Yoga Sutra 2.49

Pranayama is the practice of refinement of breath as the source of Prana. Even though the nature of Prana is to always be moving, the practice of pranayama with intention and visualization allows us to command where the energy goes. Physical purification is first.

Working with the Prana Vayus, we can initially improve the physical breath and disperse the energies to resolve imbalance and blockages. Once stability is attained, psycho-emotional purification takes place, opening the door for expansion. What starts as a physical relationship between movement and breath eventually provides the energies to build the positive life force within us. This is the supplier of health and vitality of body, mind, and emotions.

Remember the cogs wheel analogy; working with the Prana Vayus is like realigning the cogs with the center wheel in the naval. As blockages are resolved, the machine is balanced. In a state of balance, each of the Vayus feed the flame of Samana Vayu in the naval center, building the positive life force. The inner light of passion and discipline brightens and radiates outward. Like a good belly laugh, Samana Vayu can not be contained; its heat energy merges with the all pervasive, expansive power of Vyana Vayu. Vyana Vayu lives within and beyond the boarders of the physical body. When it is visible outside the skin, this luminous glow is referred to as the aura or biofield and often depicted in ancient art as a halo. Vyana Vayu is also the power that energy healers tap into when using their hands to clear and balance their client’s biofield.

Bahya abhyantara visaya aksepi caturthah
The fourth type of pranayama transcends the external and internal pranayamas, and appears effortless and non-deliberate. An entirely different state of breathing appears in the state of yoga. Then the breath transcends the level of the consciousness.
– Patanjali Yoga Sutra 2.51

Prana combines with Shakti to allow us to live our lives energetically as humans – to speak, think, move, etc. By bringing mind and breath together at the forefront of our awareness, we are intimate with Prana Shakti. Unfortunately, our Prana Shakti is limited and we can exhaust it when we do too much or are constantly overstimulated. Meditative practices counteract the exhaustion of the Shakti power. With time and in an act of surrender, these practices go deeper toward the subtle level where Prana Shakti is used to access and awaken Kundalini; this is the force of creation that is always available to us in its awakened form. Unlike Prana that is malleable (changeable), Kudalini energy is the power of being that is unchanging; the place where our true nature unfolds. Kundalini is the entirety of all of our energies of body, mind, senses, breath, and consciousness as well as the energies in the natural world we live in. It is the steadiness of Kundalini Shakti that stills Prana. Progression toward internalization is greatly benefited by bringing awareness into the heart with a positive thought, image, word, feeling etc. This is the development that goes beyond physical changes, like feeling as if you are breathing more efficiently, into spiritual cultivation. What spiritual development looks like to you is individual and depends on your background and beliefs.

Tatah ksiyate Prakash avaranam
The regular practice of pranayama reduces the obstacles that inhibit clear perception and removes the veil covering the light of knowledge and wisdom.
– Patanjali Yoga Sutra 2,52

Yoga philosophy uses the analogy of wearing mental “veils” to describe the unconscious obstacles that cause suffering and pain. Klesha means “poison” in Sanskrit, and the five Kleshas are veils that give rise to mental toxins. 1. Avidya – Ignorance, 2. Asmita – Ego 3. Raga – Attachment, 4. Dvesha – Aversion, 5. Abhinivesah – Fear of death. We know when the energy of Kundalini Shakti is accessed because our normal patterns like fear, attachment and ego in the lower chakras no longer pull us and determine our behaviors.

Access my 5 Prana Vayus In Moving Meditation on YouTube:

Udana Vayu = rising air
Location: from naval to crown of head
Focus: throat
Direction: upward and outward, exhaling, ascending,
Function: growth, communication, creative expression, enthusiasm, self-expression, universality, moving from ignorance to enlightenment
Element: ether and sound
5th Chakra: Vishuddha (throat)
Movement & Breath: Place heals of hands on the forehead. Inhale while lifting forehead to open throat, exhale to release.

Prana Vayu = vital air (this is prana vayu, as opposed to Prana itself as the life force)
Location: from head to naval
Focus: heart, chest and head
Direction: in and up, intake, inhaling/inspiration, propulsion
Function: internalization, energizing, receiving sensory impressions, forward charge, interpreting, thinking, consciousness, self knowledge and reflection, sushumna nadi
Element: all elements
All Chakras
Movement & Breath: Place hands on heart center. Breathe into heart center while opening arms to the sides and lifting head. Exhale hands and gaze back to heart.

Samana Vayu = unchanging air
Location: naval
Focus: abdomen
Direction: periphery to center, inner absorption, contraction
Function: discernment, equalization, assimilation, independence, metabolism, integrity, digesting food and oxygen, will, self esteem and definition, inner light
Element: fire
3rd Chakra: Manipura (solar plexus)
Movement & Breath: Place hands at naval center. Inhale while taking arms out to the sides and overhead, exhale to return to sides, inhale while taking arms forward and overhead, exhale to release. Repeat alternating direction of arm movement.

Apana Vayu = downward air
Location: from naval to soles of feet, lower abdomen, colon
Focus: pelvis, legs and feet
Direction: descending, outward
Function: elimination, grounding, steady, childbirth,, security, sexuality, self preservation and gratification, being in the moment, connecting to the earth
Element: water and earth
1st & 2nd Chakra: Muladhara (root) and Svadhistana (sacral)
Movement & Breath: Place hands at pelvis. Breathe into the back side while rounding the spine like a cat, exhale to bend knees and drop pelvis downward. Inhale to stand. Exhale to visualize grounding energy down into pelvis, legs and feet.

Vyana Vayu = diffused air
Location: from naval, heart, and lugs to entire body
Focus: whole body
Direction: from center to periphery, all pervading, integrates all other Prana Vayus
Function: expansiveness, circulation, coordination, reacting, distributes food, water, oxygen and energy to all parts of the body, initiates mental activity, love, compassion, healing, self acceptance, expanding, moves through gross nervous system and subtle counterpart (nadis), experienced as aura
Element: air
4th Chakra: Anahata (heart)
Movement & Breath: Focus on one side at a time. Focus on left side. Breathe into left lung while extending out through left arm and leg. Visualize energy flowing freely through Ida Nadi and entire left side of body. Breathe out to return to neutral. Repeat on left. Switch to right side. Breathe into right lung while extending out through right arm and leg. Visualize energy flowing freely through Pingala Nadi and entire right side of body.

 

The Breath Blog

For most westerners, the word “yoga” conjures up something that looks like Cirque du Soleil auditions. In truth, you can only use the excuse that you are not flexible or strong enough to do yoga 1/8 of the time, (and that doesn’t really float since yoga postures are a way to gain flexibility safely). Let me explain the 1/8 comment. The yoga postures, contorted or comfortable, function as “Asana” which is the third of eight facets in the yogic system. The purpose of Asana is to get your body into shape to sit still in meditation with as little fidgeting and discomfort as possible. Can you believe that? The goal is not to put your hands below your toes, drench yourself with sweat or increase endurance. The body is the vehicle for the spirit. Asana is not what this blog is about though, and it doesn’t even have to be part of your yoga. It wasn’t part of mine for many years since I was introduced to yoga to alleviate anxiety.

A common phrase in the yoga community is that if you can breathe, you can do yoga. This is only partially accurate. Philosophically speaking, breathing IS yoga. In the Eight Limbs of Yoga (Ashtanga), yogic breathing practices (Pranayama in Sanskrit) are so important that they claim their very own limb #4.  Pranayama is an essential part of a complete yoga practice. It involves regulating the breath to control the mind. Pranayama is also it’s own practice (no pretzel-like postures needed!). Pranayama is used to prepare for meditation; its an invitation into limb #5 Pratyahara (sensory withdrawal), the first stage of meditation.

Most yoga traditions would tell you that Pranayama is much more important than Asana when it comes to heath and happiness. If we subscribe to the philosophy that the goal of yoga is to decrease suffering, develop inner peace and feel our aliveness, it is typically Pranayama, not Asana, that awakens us to our highest potential.

The classic teaching of all wisdom traditions is that humans suffer because we forget who we are – Divine beings. We forget who we are because as humans we are hard-wired pleasure seeking survivalist. We seek enjoyment and relief from agitation and pain from things outside of ourselves – drugs (both the prescription kind and the ones that will get you in jail), alcohol, food, working too much, and in our relationships with others. The yogic path reveals that who we seek and what we need is buried inside of us under all of our human roles and repetitions of self-defeating stories.

It is just one yoga teacher’s opinion that many American yoga classes are another form of exercise. What is missing is the link of movement to a reasonable breath pace. Asana is supposed to introduce the student to regulating the breath. When the practice is too physical or choreographed like the Jimmy Fallon History of Music Video Dancing (recommended if you need to laugh after this!) the breath is strained or forgotten about all together. You may as well be hitting a punching bag or doing crossfit; nothing wrong with that – strenuous sweaty stuff can be a release valve. Additionally, a gymnast or high-endurance athlete may one up you and excel quickly at Asana practice; it is beautiful to watch the flexibility and strength of the physical body. But can that fit body sit still in meditation? That takes a fit mind! Admittedly, if what you want is a good looking exterior, any exercise may work. What about exercising the mind? Do you do something that increases awareness and brings inner peace? Sleeping does not count – unless you have mastered lucid dreaming. We are multi-layered beings with a physical body, mental body and spiritual origin. Pranayama is experienced on the physical level as the breath, but it takes us beyond into the mental and spiritual layers of ourself. Pranayama is a fitness program for all the layers of our being.

On the physical level, Pranayama positively influences the systems of the body including respiratory, immune, cardiac and nervous system. Typically, our breath is automatic and involuntary. It is continuous and we do not have to think about it, but we only use about 20% of our breathing capability. The mechanics of your default breath might include chest breathing, which is too shallow to bring in maximum oxygen and does not allow the lungs to be fully expelled. The diaphragm is the main muscle of respiration but it is is often under utilized. The chest muscles are considered accessory muscles in breathing. When we maximize the role of the diaphragm in respiration, our breathing is slower, fuller and more powerful. We increase our oxygen consumption and the ability to release carbon dioxide. We also exercise the often tight respiratory muscles.

The pattern of your breath is intimately connected to the mind. There is a breath pattern for every emotion. By learning to control the breath, we control the mind and emotions as well. Our involuntary breath responds to fatigue, stress or fear unconsciously by being incomplete or unbalanced. This auto-response ranges from the more obvious hyperventilation, shallow rapid breathing or to a simple reflexive sigh. The breath is the bridge between the brain (what your thinking) and body (what you feel). A starting point to control emotions is to simply observe the breath as it is. You could even close your eyes and do that right now for 1 minute…

Breath observation makes us more sensitive. Observation takes us into the present moment were we notice when the mind runs off to ruminate over the past or worry about the future. Our breath is a built in mindfulness teacher. But put your phone down – it doesn’t require money or meditation apps. We learn to block outer distractions and uncover what is especially present inside us. This is not for everybody and contrary to popular belief, it can be unpleasant. We may learn what troubles or agitates us; a bit like being stuck sitting with a blabbermouth stranger on a small airplane. You just want to put your headphones in and block her/him out, but the stranger is you. Instead of escaping physical or mental pain, we embrace it and lessen it with acceptance.

Once breath observation reveals what we are hiding from, we learn to safely and consciously lengthen and control the inhale (puraka) and exhale (rechaka). This practice alters the brain’s information processing. When we breath voluntarily, we actually change the region of the brain that we breathe from – unconscious breathing is controlled by the lower brain or brain stem and conscious breathing is function of the upper brain. We also balance the heart rate; the inhale slightly increases heart rate and the exhale relaxes the heart. By controlling the breath, we can listen to the chatty stranger in our mind with kindness, and redirect the story when it is not serving us. Pranayama is a free companion fair where you get to pick the person you want to sit with (you) and tell them when they are being irrational.

Energetically or spiritually (choose the term you like), Pranayama is how we begin to direct our Prana, Chi or life force (again – pick the term that works for you). On the subtle level, inhalation increases our focus, energy and vitality; the breathe out is an opportunity to purge, purify and relax more deeply. Eventually, you can learn to add a breath retention (kumbaka) which culminates in a balanced mind and provides a “peaceful pause” in energy body. The power of controlled breathing leads to a fusing of the complimentary opposites of solar/lunar and expand/contract. In this state of balance, the pleasure seeking senses and physical cravings are controlled.

Yogis believe we are all given a particular number of breaths in each karmic cycle. A lifespan is only limited by the number of breaths you breathe. Listen to the sound of breath in your own body as the argument of being alive.

Namaste,

Megan

PS – If you are looking for a place to get started with a Pranayama practice at home, visit the Breath Meditation Series in the free meditation library. BFY also offers free meditations the second Wednesday of each month or a private Pranayama and Meditation session with Megan can address your unique needs.

Eight Limbs of Yoga: Ashtanga in The Honey Jar

Do you want to know what meditation is?  If you practice yoga, did you know that yoga postures and meditation are inextricably linked? Meditation is the highest form of yoga.  There are common misconceptions around the terms meditation and mindfulness, and dare I say liberation.  This is the definition of meditation from the point of the Yoga Sutras, a classic yogic text.  Ashtanga, which refers to the 8 limbs of yoga (ashta – eight, anga – limbs), is the foundational text for anyone who wants to bring more of the benefits of their yoga practice into daily life.

#1 Yamas – Why are you buying the honey in the first place? Who are you going to feed it to? Will it in some way bring joy or harmony to others? Yamas are the social ethics of yoga. Feed others only what you would want to eat yourself.

#2 Niyamas – Take the time to read the label before you buy the honey; for your own good.  Buy locally to support your unique geography. The main ingredient in the Niyamas is your own true nature flavored with self-discipline (tapas – the flame of purification). Observe the inner self and be aware of what you put in your body, mind and spirit.  You are what you eat.

#3 Asana – In order to get that thick, golden honey out of the jar, you may need to stir it around a bit first.  But not so much that the jar breaks. Asana refers to the physical practice of yoga, (what is often mistaken as yoga itself.) Just as the honey dipper moves the viscous liquid with both determination and vigilance, yoga postures are done with alertness and ease. Even if the shape of the glass jar does not change, there is movement on the inside. You are creating stability and freedom in the body that will allow it to sit comfortably in meditation .

#4 Pranayama – Have you noticed how air fills the empty spaces in the honey jar? It is like prana in the body.  The jar represents our body of “matter” as we stabilize it in posture. The prana, or life force energy that fills the body in the form of the breath floods and mobilizes those spaces.  Pranayama (prana -life force, ayama – to extend or draw out) is using awareness and technique to regulate the physical and energetic breath. You are balancing the flow of prana in the body.

#5 Pratyahara – The honey slowly begins to trickle down.  You can hear it, see it, smell it, touch it and maybe even imagine the taste.  This is pratyhara, the beginning stage of meditation, which is often confused with meditation itself.  Our mind is active, and something stimulates the senses; we turn them inward to cultivate the experience.  Think of techniques such as guided imagery, yoga nidra, use of mantra or chanting, and pranayama techniques; or zen-like activities like running or surfing can feel meditative.  But we are still doing.

#6 Dharana and #7 Dhyana – The honey comes out at first in spontaneous drips (dharana) and eventually in an even flow (dhyana).  Both of these limbs are states of being as opposed to doing. The difference between the two is quantity vs. quality.  Dharana gives you small tastes of the bliss of meditation as the mind comes and goes.  In a state of Dhyana, your world is nothing but an even flow of honey and you have let go completely into the sukha (sweetness or joy of life).

#8 Samadhi – The full stream of honey is coming out continuously.  We are no longer aware of this though.  We are the honey (liberation to our Divine being-ness and oneness).

Just as eating local honey brings amazing health benefits to your body, meditation drips sweetness into all aspects of our lives.  It is liquid gold for the mind and spirit. You don’t have to be a bee keeper to make 2019 the year to open the honey jar!

Peace and Light,

Megan

Meditation Into the Chakras

Why an Audio Meditation on the Chakras

When someone begins to experience their subtle body or energy body, whether it is through an assisted healing modality like acupuncture or reiki, or in a yoga class, skepticism turns to curiosity. I am often asked for recommendations on books about the chakras.  Despite my collection of worthy books by knowledgable writers about chakras, nadis, kundalini, marma points, tantra, etc, personal and professional experience have taught me that meditation is the most creative, authentic way to introduce oneself to, explore, and expand the seven energy centers. Reading books on the chakras without experiential play time is like reading a cook book and never getting the satisfaction of eating any of the recipes. The intellectual knowledge a book provides on the subtle body only finds its power when it is in harmonious relationship with our intuitive perception. I believe intuition is organically accessible through sound healing and meditation.

Mind Body

Unlike when many of the ancient spiritual traditions were developed, we now have a scientific explanation on how the brain works.There is excellent research being done on the benefits of meditation all over the globe (and at our very own Center for Heathy Minds at the University of Wisconsin, Madison). Written words are fodder for the left brain, which intends to intellectualize and rationalize the information that comes through our five senses. Just as the five senses are gates of perception for the mind, the chakras feed the body information about the the world around us by metabolizing energy. To heal all levels of our being, we need to enter the expanded state of consciousness of the right brain. Where the brain goes, energy flows.

“ I maintain that cosmic religious feeling is the strongest and noblest incitement to scientific research” – Albert Einstein

Energy Body

Called Chi, Qi, astral light, Prana, the field, or depicted as a halo as it often was in ancient paintings, all religious and spiritual traditions recognize our bodies as light energy. Spiritual awareness is a transformational process that takes place in this realm. Even in conventional medicine, we see the use of sound and light for both evaluation and treatment of the physical body. When we block experiences from our mind (often unconsciously), we also block the electromagnetic energy flow of the experience. To use a term I don’t particularly care for, energy gets “stuck” in our bodies, causing pain, physical and emotional discomfort and disease. Our bodies naturally attempt to remove these blockages; an example of this is the flow of tears, yet we are taught from a young age not to cry. Sound healing and meditation are safe acceptable ways to release physical and emotional trauma and agitation from the body. They can also help to balance an overreactive energy system.

Disbelievers

In my field, I compassionately excuse cynics. They do not have the ability to believe in something they have not experienced for themselves. Undoubtably, it is not because they can’t. We all have higher states of consciousness available to us. It is our mental conditioning, the gluttony of information flooding our sympathetic nervous systems, and the way in which modern society holds intellect above intuition that prevents us from reaching our energetic potential. Expanding our state of awareness is a matter of accepting our unlimited potential and being still with as few external distractions as possible.

Motivators

This project is for all of my students who have journeyed into their subtle body, perhaps unintentionally in a yoga class or sound healing; you are my instigators. With every awakened encounter you experience, my inner child jumps for joy! We are ALL always healing from something; only the significance and awareness varies. Remember to set your books and phones down and put technique and tradition in the back seat. Study your heart. Love is the universal healer.Thank you to all my teachers in the fields of Yoga, Ayurveda, and the Healing Touch Program for making me see that there is more than one way into the subtle body – and there is no right way. In gratitude to my gifted musical counterpart, Michael, for exploring planet earth with me from the inside out.

Utilize

I value the Western medicine model, but the bio-mechanical paradigm is about curing. Healing occurs separate from curing. It can take place within any level of our being – physical, psychological and spiritual. Start by utilizing this meditation for your own healing. Keep it simple – we are energy and awareness. Enter the subtle body. When you are ready to be your own greatest healer, bring your energy to the level of the heart. Share that with others through a gentle touch or hugs. And never stop wondering, growing and believing we are infinite.

With Love and Light,

Megan